[Foodie Friday] Hokkaido Milk Bread

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The other day I was shopping at the supermarket at I12 and saw packets of Hokkaido milk for sale. My first thought was to use it to bake the Hokkaido Milk Bread and it was weeks later that I got to bake it.

This recipe is taken from the video above and it uses the Tang Zhong method which promises a soft bread texture. I used about 250g of the bread dough to make red bean buns since Faith and I love red bean anything. This time round, I used the paste from the can but the next time I bake them, I’ll make sure to make it from scratch.

For the Tangzhong
250ml water
75g all purpose flour

For bread dough
375g all-purpose flour
4 tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 packet yeast (2.5 tsp)
125ml Hokkaido Milk
1 egg
145g tangzhong
3 tablespoons butter, melted

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1.    To prepare the tangzhong.  In a medium heat pan, combine water and flour mixture until it thickens like a paste.  Remove from the heat and let it cool completely.

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2.    To prepare the dough, sieve the flour and combine with sugar, salt, and yeast in the mixer bowl.  In a mixing bowl, beat the egg and add the milk, butter to the egg and whisk to combine.

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3.    Add the wet ingredients into the flour mixture.  Using the dough hook, mix for 1 minute.  Add 145g (1/2cup) of the tangzhong and continue to mix until a dough is formed. The texture should be smooth and sticky. Store the remaining amount of TangZhong in the refrigerator for at most 3 days.

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4.    Cover with clingfilm and leave in a warm place to proof until double the size, about 1 hour.

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5.    Sprinkle some flour on the counter surface.  My dough weighs about 780g and I set aside 250g of the dough for my red bean buns. Divide the remaining dough into 4 equal pieces and use a circular motion to shape them into balls.

6.    Using a rolling pin, roll dough into an oval shape disk about 1cm thick, fold the edges to the middle and roll again into 1cm thick.  Roll to form a tube like shape

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7.    Place 4 rolls seam side down into an oiled loaf pan. I used a silicon one.

8.    Let it rise again until double in shape for another 30 minutes to an hour.

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9.    Preheat the oven to 180°C. Do an egg wash on the surface of the dough and bake the loaf for about 15-20 minutes in total.  When you see that the loaf turns golden brown, cover the bread with foil to prevent over-browning.

10.    When the bread is ready, let it cool for 5 minutes and shake it off the pan and place it on the cooling rack.

For the red bean buns, I weigh five 50g bread dough and roll them into balls. Thereafter, I divide the can of red bean paste into 5 portions. Each ball of dough is flattened and then the red bean paste is wrapped inside it. Then put it into the muffin pan with the seam side down.

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Bake the red bean buns together with the Hokkaido Milk Bread for the same amount of time.

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A word of caution though. Look at the bun that has ‘exploded’? That’s because I put too much red bean paste in it. And you are right. I didn’t divide the paste properly so when it came to the last bun, I tried to stuff as much paste as possible. ;(

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The Milk Bread is truly soft!
Try it when you are free.
😉

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‘Watermelon’ raisin bread

This week, the hubs and I finally decided that enough is enough and sleep-training has to be administered to little Faith. For months, we did not have quality sleep because Faith woke up a few times in the night and needed us to soothe her back to sleep. Initially, we thought we had it easy since she could sleep through the night when she was about 3 months old but that changed when she experienced teething.

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So, our sleep-training started on Monday. It proved easier for me when the hubs took over. I was simply too soft-hearted and felt terrible having to hear her cry so badly. It’s heart-wrenching. Yesterday, the crying was bad and to distract myself by surfing the Internet for baking recipes. It was then that I stumbled upon the video on Watermelon lookalike raisin bread and logged it into my mind that I would bake the following day. Faith loves bread and I thought this should turn out all right as compared to my previous failed panda bread attempt.

I didn’t really follow how it was done in the video. I guess in bread making, there are some fundamentals that we will all adhere to but there are certainly different ways to doing it. Here’s mine (I’m using the Tang Zhong/ water roux since I want a very light version for my bread. You can also use the standard bread dough for this):

Recipe for the water dough “water roux”:
Cook 250g water with 50g bread flour at medium low heat. Keep stirring until it becomes thickened and there’re no lumps left. If you’ve a candy thermometer, measure it until the temperature turn to 65C then turn off the heat. Transfer to a clean bowl and cover with a cling wrap to avoid skin forming. The amount of water dough here would be more than what a recipe requires. You could store it in the fridge for about 2 days.
Recipe for the bread (approximately 550g for the dough):
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90g plain flour
12g milk powder
30g caster sugar
6g salt
6g yeast
60g beaten eggs
65g room temperature water
75g water roux (cooled & at room temperature)
(B) 45g unsalted butter
(C) 3/4 cup raisins
(D) Red and green food colouring (I used Wilton’s) or use Matcha powder for green
1. Put ingredients (A) and knead using the dough hook until it becomes dough-like and then add in the unsalted butter (B). Continue kneading for about 15 minutes at medium speed until the dough becomes elastic and does not stick to the side of the mixing bowl. You should hear the ‘flap, flap’ sound. 🙂
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2. Divide the  dough into 3 portions in this proportions – 150g (neutral colour), 150g (green) and the remaining for red. Add in the food colours and knead till it has reached the desired colours. Add in the raisins for the red dough and mix till they are evenly incorporated. Let them proof for 40 minutes in clean bowls covered with cling wrap.
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3. Punch down the dough to release the air. Let rest for about 10 minutes.
4. For the red dough, roll it into a log the length of your baking tin. Flatten the neutral-coloured dough and make sure it is big enough to wrap the red dough. You can use a rolling pin to do so. For me, I just use my palm and flatten like the roti prata man. Do the same for the green dough and wrap. Do make sure you seal the seams well, if not, they will open when they go into the oven. The following are the steps.
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5. Place the completed dough in the baking tin (9″ x 5″) [mine is slightly smaller] and proof for 40 minutes. 15 minutes before it is due for baking, switch on the oven to a temperature of 180C.
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6. Egg wash the top of the dough for 15 – 20 minutes. The loaf of bread is done when you hear a hollow sound as you tap the top of the bread. Unmould the loaf and let cool completely on a cooling rack before you cut it into slices.
Note: I would use more matcha powder the next time for green. I suspect it will make a nice combination with raisins. 😉 There’s so much room for improvement. Try it and let me know how it turns out!
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Linking up with

Teach as you bake.

I love teaching because I see the value of education for it enriches and empowers one.

That is one main reason why I chose to become a teacher in the first place.

Then I got interested in baking and realised that it isn’t as daunting as I thought it to be.

When friends told me that they dare not bake and wanted me to share with them, I couldn’t resist.

It’s always good to empower people, even in baking.

In Boston, I started giving one-on-one baking tutorial…

Teaching Y chocolate cupcakes

Teaching Y chocolate cupcakes

And macarons...

And macarons…

And then a pair…

Teaching the gals potato gratin and macarons

Teaching the gals potato gratin and macarons

And subsequently, a group.

Teaching the folks raspberry sandwich biscuits

Teaching the folks raspberry sandwich biscuits

Teaching macarons to a group of lovelies

Teaching macarons to a group of lovelies

So, I thought, “Maybe I can continue to teach baking to whoever wants to learn how to bake a certain item?”

It happened yesterday when i invited two ladies to bake Lemon Meringue Tartlets since they expressed much enthusiasm in my pictures (posted on FB).

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I enjoyed myself tremendously. There is nothing like seeing a person become more confident in doing a certain task after showing her the ropes. Satisfaction to the maximum.

Perhaps, I can teach baking at my home… for a small fee?

Do you think this is feasible?

* By the way, I had a good photographer friend, Mabel, on that day who has an eye for details so Natasha could document her learning from the pictures captured.
Awesome.

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