8 more days…

I have been fortunate this year. I have won quite a few things in lucky draws and all were related to work. Hump! And I have gotten 2 free tickets to NDP preview for tomorrow! Okay! I know it is nothing great. After all, when I was back in school, we would bring our P5 kids to NDP show for their NE but this time round, it was different! For one, I would not need to look after the kids and thus less stressful. Secondly, I would be going with my best friend although I am not sure if he is even half as enthusiastic as I am. Thirdly, NDP is held in Padang and I have never attended one in Padang.It would be quite an experience!

Cameras, pls standby.

And the clouds cleared just in time for our farewell bbq organised by the dear colleagues. There’s even course placement letters sent to us! Whoah! How organised! It was fun and we had a great time chatting and before we knew it, it was already late in the night (by my standard). Fun! Fun! Fun! How I loved their company!

Advertisements

9 more days…

 Let’s start tracking what Ken and I would stuff into our stomach prior to our departure. We definitely would miss Asian food so first for dinner at Eastpoint’s food court today:

    

On a separate note, work has been slow for me at the office though for others, they were engaged in a flurry of meetings. Of course! This is the peak period with many big events coming up and all would be busy. At times, I felt happy that I did not have to be so heavily involved but at the same time, there is a sense of loss when you find yourself not participating and toiling with your comrades.

Continue reading

Cake decorating class

And so this day, I decided to go for a cake decorating class at Le Cordon Bleu, MA. Ok, I totally know I will suffer there as my decorating technique is really bad. The previous time when I signed up for the cookie decorating class, I totally failed to meet my own expectations. But I will still seek to learn! It’s just a 3-hr class so I reckon it won’t be so bad.

It happens to be on the day when I signed up for the campus tour. Cool! The date coincides!

10 more days…

10 more days to go!!!

And so this day, I decided to go for a cake decorating class at Le Cordon Bleu, MA. Ok, I totally know I will suffer there as my decorating technique is really bad but I will still seek to learn! It’s just a 3-hr class so I reckon it won’t be so bad.

It happens to be on the day when I signed up for the campus tour. Cool! The date coincides!

And so, the branch organised a farewell lunch for the 3 of us who will be leaving for US and UK, both for further studies. And big boss is leaving for Harvard too and though I love this man to bits, I am not particularly excited of the possibility of bumping into him at MA (ehheh).

Free dinner at The Soup Spoon as we have accumulated enough points but..but…the standards had dropped so greatly! Sigh! Why can’t you maintain the quality that you used to have?

 

12 working days more…

…and I would start my NPL.

So, we came back from our trip and are ready for the next one which will promise much more adventures and thrill. While Ken went for BSF yesterday, I decided that I should start packing especially since we are expecting meet-ups with friends and what not.

So, yours truly packed in 17kg of winter clothing and 4 pairs of shoes into the luggage. Thankfully, I could find my parka jacket which really kept me warm when I was in London and Paris two years ago. Although the hubs was saying that we could purchase more stuff over in US, I would prefer not to if I could help it, especially winter clothing. When would we need them again??? I would rather use the money on other stuff like baking items, short trips and the like.

So, now the winter clothing and shoes are done, next is the sports attire and working and casual clothings. I hope those would not hit more than 20kg though I’m not very confident with the inclusion of those toiletries.

And what is at the back of my mind these days as I look forward to Boston?

1. New York Marathon. Oh gosh! I really need to start intensive training!
2. Baking Boot camp at CIA. Yes! So looking forward. I reckon I won’t spend tens of thousands in culinary school so the boot camp will kinda satisfy everything I need – the basics, working in professional kitchen and training under great chefs!
3. I am planning my own culinary curriculum so I’m excited! I’m so gonna hit the books!
4. New York in Aug to recce for the marathon route!
5. Scouting for church in Boston. Park Street maybe? Oh Lord, pls guide!
6. Volunteer at Boston Partners in Education. I still want to stay in touch with education and perhaps learn from the US schools! =)

Delicacies in Kunming

Ten days in Kunming, Yunnan Province and the first dish that we tried was Cross Bridge Rice Noodles. It is a typical Yunnan local flavor that carries with itself a vivid love story: In the Qing Dynasty, there was a scholar studying hard on an island in Nanhu Lake of Mengzi County in South Yunnan Province. His wife sent meals for him every day. But due to the long distance, the rice got cold when she arrived at the island. Later, she filled the soup with pottery and put a spoonful of chick fat on the surface of the soup to keep the soup hot. Thus, the noodles could be eaten upon scalding and tasted delicious.

When you step into a store selling this famous dish, you will be served several courses and a big bowl of chicken soup with very thick oil on top to keep the heat for cooking the food items, including raw pork, cooked chicken pieces, pork liver, slices of squid and slices of carp. These constitute the first few courses to be dipped into the boiling hot soup. Vegetables are then added afterwards as the second course, and the rice noodles follow as the last course.

Others that went into our stomach include Liang Ban Mi Xian (my favourite), Youtiao and smelly beancurd which is commonly sold in markets. The beancurd is baked across the iron net with fire, brushed with vegetable oil to give a golden coat and sprinkled with condiment.  Another snack is the Modern Cake (Modeng Baba) which is made of flour, corn powder, sticky rice, lard, sesame and meat. The initiators of Modern Baba were two pretty sisters who made sweet and tasteful Baba that attracts people even today. Modern Baba has a crisp exterior and a soft interior; it is sweet with savory cream.

The Chinese are very hospitable and this culture extends to the villagers even though they do have much to offer to the guests as they are poor. We visited a family and lo and behold, the family slaughtered a pig for us and whipped up a nine-course meal which comprised a plate of pigeon and various vegetable dishes. Vegetables (especially Suan Cai – pickled veg) are always found as part of a typical meal.

The eye-opening experience

The 10 days passed just like that. I’m thankful for the experience and to be able to participate in this adventure with the Lord. He has seen us through and opened our eyes to see that there are many who are so much less fortunate than us.

I’m thankful for this opportunity and that the hubs was able to join in too. What a privilege!

From the bookshelf: Becoming a Chef

Andrew Dornenburg & Karen Page

I’m so glad I got to read this book at a time when I was deciding if I should attend culinary school. I was instantly introduced to the culinary world, knowing about chefs of yesterday and current ones. One of the best parts was the advice by many different chefs who have climbed the ranks through on-the-job learning; they were able to give different perspective to attending culinary school. I also love the many quotes in the book. Every aspiring chef should read this book.

Now I know about James Beard, Alice Walters and caught a glimpse of the lives of chefs. I salute them for their passion despite the long hours in the hot kitchen. Many do not make it big nor do they make big bucks yet they continue the journey because they love food and to make people happy.

In short, between schooling and apprenticeship, Madeleine Kamman had this to say ~ A school puts a seal of approval on a graduate, but so does a good master. After teaching two generations of American chefs, both in the classroom and at the stove, I remain a great advocate of the European system, which combines schooling in the daytime and restaurant work at night, for it is fitting and demanding preparation to practice a profession, which I believe to be the most demanding existing.

A must read. Additional quotes I love:

Continue reading

Mid Week!

And the last day of work before we set off for Kunming!

My dear colleague, Doremon lent me a cookbook, apparently for the lazy souls. Just use the rice cooker to cook! However it is in Chinese which will take me forever to make sense of it. Well, pics help for now. Counting down, we must really appreciate the times that we have with one another.

From the bookshelf…

Even if you are not in culinary school, you should enrich yourself with the necessary knowledge. Actually, all the more you should do so when you intend to venture into this world on your own. Unfortunately, I can’t bring these along to Boston, so Boston Public Library, I’m counting on you!

countdown


32 + 3 days more to Boston.

1 more day before mingling in Kunming.

13 more days before my NPL starts and am free to pursue my interest.

13 + xx days before Ken could take a breather!

Hang in there!

From the bookshelf

Even if you are not in culinary school, you should enrich yourself with the necessary knowledge. Actually, all the more you should do so when you intend to venture into this world on your own. Unfortunately, I can’t bring these along to Boston, so Boston Public Library, I’m counting on you!

The culinary world

As I read up more, I found myself stepping into another world. The culinary world is an exciting one but not without pain. I felt that I am just at the tip of the iceberg. That’s so much, so much more to explore.

I’m no longer satisfied by recipes. I believe if you follow the instructions and inituition, the food can come out fine. I want more. I want to know the science of it, simple questions like ‘why do we use certain flour for certain recipe?’, ‘How much air was trapped using whisking?’, ‘Why do we use certain temperature for certain cakes, tarts, etc?’ These are really basic questions and there are many more questions I want to ask. I need to know the basics, the fundamentals because with that knowledge, I can then use my creativitiy to come out with different products. Hmm..I need to get hold of the book ‘Baking Boot Camp’ which I highly suspect will provide me with the answers of some of my questions.

Meanwhile, I’m enjoying the book that I’m reading and the kiasu me have borrowed a few more books by Michael Ruhlman. Koko has also made copies of Singaporean recipes for me to attempt. And today she made Peranakan Laksa! I certainly hope she could impart her knowledge to me in time to come.

Chocolate cake

Decided to bake a chocolate cake for CG and I need it to be simple as I don’t have much time today. Thankfully, I have all the ingredients needed at home.

Makes one 18-cm cake

35g cake flour
50g cocoa powder
100g sweet chocolate, cut into small cubes ( I used 67%)
80g unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
50g castor sugar
4 egg yolks
50g whipping cream

MERINGUE
4 egg whites
110g castor sugar

1. Preheat oven to 170C. Line cake pan with parchment or natural drawing paper (must! easier to remove the cake from the pan). Sift flour and cocoa powder twice.

2. Melt chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl over a double boiler. Once chocolate and butter has melted, add sugar, egg yolks and cream and mix well using a whisk. Set aside.

3. Make meringue. Beat egg whites until foamy. Add half of sugar and continue beating for a few minutes, then add remaining sugar and beat until egg whites are glossy and stiff peaks form.

4. Add 1/3 of meringue to chocolate mixture and fold with a whisk. Add flour and cocoa powder and fold in thoroughly. Add remaining meringue and fold just until incorporated.

5. Pour batter into prepared cake pan and bake for about 50 minutes (baking time may vary according to your oven). When cake is done, remove from pan and leave to cool on a wire rack.

6. To serve, slice cake into even pieces, dust with icing sugar and spoon a scoop of vanilla ice-cream on the side.

The culinary world

As I read up more, I found myself stepping into another world. The culinary world is an exciting one but not without pain. I felt that I am just at the tip of the iceberg. That’s so much, so much more to explore.

I’m no longer satisfied by recipes. I believe if you follow the instructions and inituition, the food can come out fine. I want more. I want to know the science of it, simple questions like ‘why do we use certain flour for certain recipe?’, ‘How much air was trapped using whisking?’, ‘Why do we use certain temperature for certain cakes, tarts, etc?’ These are really basic questions and there are many more questions I want to ask. I need to know the basics, the fundamentals because with that knowledge, I can then use my creativitiy to come out with different products. Hmm..I need to get hold of the book ‘Baking Boot Camp’ which I highly suspect will provide me with the answers of some of my questions.

Meanwhile, I’m enjoying the book that I’m reading and the kiasu me have borrowed a few more books by Michael Ruhlman. Koko has also made copies of Singaporean recipes for me to attempt. And today she made Peranakan Laksa! I certainly hope she could impart her knowledge to me in time to come.

Replies

The kitchen smells of chocolate now and the oven is about to produce a chocolate cake.

These few days, besides researching on culinary schools, I have been emailing friends/blogger about culinary school. There were two and coincidentally, they are now in Le Cordon Bleu (LCB).

Basically, besides hearing wonderful/ scary tales about culinary schools, I thought it would be better to hear from existing students themselves.

Victoria of Decadence Cakes (oh! She bakes wonderfully well!) is in LCB, Paris and commented that the chefs are very strict and demand the best from the students. The classes are mainly made up of demo and practical, hardly the science of it which is really what I am looking for.

Joy, a fellow blogger, is currently in LCB, Boston and is enjoying herself thoroughly. Her reply?

short answer for LCB: top grade facilities & resources. Even though it’s separately operated from the European locations, the name carries a lot of weight. If you have any interest in entering the industry, you will build a very solid skill set here. A lot of the experience will depend on your own personality and maturity level. For me, the school offers all the parts I need but I’m also very good at expanding my own educational experiences beyond the classroom.

You know, at the end of the day, I think culinary school helps in building a solid foundation and knowledge about culinary arts/baking. Experience counts more and would be wonderful if you could work under a chef who is willing to impart the skills to you. Your own maturity counts. Even in choosing any university, if you enter an Ivy league college and then play half the time away, what you will get is shit out of it. It really depends on how much you want to put in. You reap what you sow.

I’m also now reading Becoming a chef by Andrew Dornenburg & Karen Page. It’s really a must read in helping to understand the whole process of the journey of becoming a chef and you really reflect as you read.

Ok. The chocolate cake is ready!

Replies.

The kitchen smells of chocolate now and the oven is about to produce a chocolate cake.

These few days, besides researching on culinary schools, I have been emailing friends/blogger about culinary school. There were two and coincidentally, they are now in Le Cordon Bleu (LCB).

Basically, besides hearing wonderful/ scary tales about culinary schools, I thought it would be better to hear from existing students themselves.

Victoria of Decadence Cakes (oh! She bakes wonderfully well!) is in LCB, Paris and commented that the chefs are very strict and demand the best from the students. The classes are mainly made up of demo and practical, hardly the science of it which is really what I am looking for.

Joy, a fellow blogger, is currently in LCB, Boston and is enjoying herself thoroughly. Her reply?

short answer for LCB: top grade facilities & resources. Even though it’s separately operated from the European locations, the name carries a lot of weight. If you have any interest in entering the industry, you will build a very solid skill set here. A lot of the experience will depend on your own personality and maturity level. For me, the school offers all the parts I need but I’m also very good at expanding my own educational experiences beyond the classroom.

You know, at the end of the day, I think culinary school helps in building a solid foundation and knowledge about culinary arts/baking. Experience counts more and would be wonderful if you could work under a chef who is willing to impart the skills to you. Your own maturity counts. Even in choosing any university, if you enter an Ivy league college and then play half the time away, what you will get is shit out of it. It really depends on how much you want to put in. You reap what you sow.

I’m also now reading Becoming a chef by Andrew Dornenburg & Karen Page. It’s really a must read in helping to understand the whole process of the journey of becoming a chef and you really reflect as you read.

Ok. The chocolate cake is ready!

Question…

… and be honest with yourself.

Over the months, as I googled and read books on pastry chefs and their beginnings, many of them had similar history. They had wonderful careers that fetched them great bucks. Some were accountants, pharmacists, lawyers and teachers, to name a few. However, in their free time, they cooked/baked (I’m using these terms interchangeably in this entry). Eventually, the mundane of work compelled them to assess what they really wanted out of their work, their lives and eventually they decided to drop what they were doing and entered culinary schools.

The successful ones (ok, I only managed to read about successful cases because they blogged about it!) went on to teach in schools, privately and opening up their own cooking school/ bakery.

Of course, they are always those who are self-taught and I have immense respect for them.

So, I find myself in a similar situation, somewhat. OK. I love teaching. I don’t dread it. It’s not pushing me to want to end my career, so to speak. I would like to think that I’m building my passion and it is one that could help support me financially in the near future should I not teach.

Knowing what I want out of this passion is important for the next steps which could be costly. There are three options that I could take:
1. Bake and learn from books and practise and practise.
2. Bake, learn from books, learn from others aka take short courses and volunteer in some bakery and restaurants.
3. Enrol in culinary school.

Continue reading

Culinary school?

It must be the chef coat.

No. I think it’s the joy of seeing the surprised look and smile on the hub’s face.

I don’t know when it started.

The thought wasn’t new. Last Christmas, there was this game which we were asked what was one thing that you really really wanted (something to that sort) and I wrote on that small piece of paper – Le Cordon Bleu.

I started baking last year. Baking wasn’t entirely new to me. We all went through home economics classes in our Secondary School and I remember I aced it. I loved what was created in the end. They made me smile.

Over the years, I lost track of baking because the oven at home somehow went on a strike and refused to work. Mom was getting busier and thus her interest for baking waned as well. I was not really encouraged in the kitchen because mom was fussy about her territory and always nagged us on the mess we could create.

Last year, the interest came back because Ken’s place has got an oven, waiting to be used. I tried on the simplest recipe – the chocolate chip cookies – and when I popped them into my mouth, that kind of heavenly feeling came back. Encouraged was I and more baking resulted.

Continue reading

Family time

It’s been a loooong week. By Friday, the spirits were weary. The only thing that we looked forward to was the homecoming of sis and family and of course little Dallen!

He’s getting very adorable!

Thank God for a smooth LASIK operation for bro, successful but painful surgery for father and of course another week survived for us.

Counting down. The hubs is really getting very tired. He needs a break.

Questions…

… and be honest with yourself.

Over the months, as I googled and read books on pastry chefs and their beginnings, many of them had similar history. They had wonderful careers that fetched them great bucks. Some were accountants, pharmacists, lawyers and teachers, to name a few. However, in their free time, they cooked/baked (I’m using these terms interchangeably in this entry). Eventually, the mundane of work compelled them to assess what they really wanted out of their work, their lives and eventually they decided to drop what they were doing and entered culinary schools.

The successful ones (ok, I only managed to read about successful cases because they blogged about it!) went on to teach in schools, privately and opening up their own cooking school/ bakery.

Of course, they are always those who are self-taught and I have immense respect for them.

So, I find myself in a similar situation, somewhat. OK. I love teaching. I don’t dread it. It’s not pushing me to want to end my career, so to speak. I would like to think that I’m building my passion and it is one that could help support me financially in the near future should I not teach.

Knowing what I want out of this passion is important for the next steps which could be costly. There are three options that I could take:
1. Bake and learn from books and practise and practise.
2. Bake, learn from books, learn from others aka take short courses and volunteer in some bakery and restaurants.
3. Enrol in culinary school.

Continue reading

Culinary school?

It must be the chef coat.

No. I think it’s the joy of seeing the surprised look and smile on the hub’s face.

I don’t know when it started.

The thought wasn’t new. Last Christmas, there was this game which we were asked what was one thing that you really really wanted (something to that sort) and I wrote on that small piece of paper – Le Cordon Bleu.

I started baking last year. Baking wasn’t entirely new to me. We all went through home economics classes in our Secondary School and I remember I aced it. I loved what was created in the end. They made me smile.

Over the years, I lost track of baking because the oven at home somehow went on a strike and refused to work. Mom was getting busier and thus her interest for baking waned as well. I was not really encouraged in the kitchen because mom was fussy about her territory and always nagged us on the mess we could create. 

Last year, the interest came back  because Ken’s place has got an oven, waiting to be used. I tried on the simplest recipe – the chocolate chip cookies – and when I popped them into my mouth, that kind of heavenly feeling came back.  Encouraged was I and more baking resulted.

Continue reading

Banana loaf

The neighbour next door gave us a bunch of bananas and I thought I should make banana loaf. Good opportunity!

Makes 1 medium loaf cake

250g plain flour
1 tsp baking powder
a good pinch of salt
75g light brown muscovado sugar
75g caster sugar
100g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing tin
2 large eggs
250g peeled ripe bananas – about 2 large bananas
75g plain chocolate chips or chunks

1 900g loaf tin

1. Preheat oven to 180C/Gas 4. Grease kitchen paper and fit it into the tin so that it covers the base and the two ends of the tin.

2. Put the flour, baking powder and salt into a sieve set over a mixing bowl and sift into the bowl. Add the sugars and stir in with a wooden spoon. Make a well in the centre.

3. Put the butter into a small pan and melt the butter over very low heat or do it in the microwave. Break the eggs and beat them.

4. Add the melted butter and the eggs to the well in the flour mixture.

5. Put the peeled bananas on to a plate and mash with a fork, but don’t make them too smooth or like a puree – there should still be some lumpy bits.

6.Add the bananas and chocolate chips to the well in the bowl.

7. Mix all the ingredients together with the wooden spoon until thoroughly combined, with no streaks of flour visible.

8. Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin and spread evenly. Bake for 55 minutes or until golden brown. Remove the rin from the oven and put it on a wire rack to cool completely, then remove the loaf from the tin and peel off the paper. Store banana loaf in an airtight container and eat it within 5 days.

Other ideas:
Add 100g walnut or pecan pieces to the mixture when you mix in the bananas. Or try 50g sultanas or milk chocolate chips.

Banana loaf

The neighbour next door gave us a bunch of bananas and I thought I should make banana loaf. Good opportunity! I’ve added raisins and chocolate for some variation.

Choux puffs

Dismissal of failure is folly. And it’s worse if one allows failure to break you.

Since that day when I failed in my experimentation with choux puffs, I resolved to attempt again because I suspected that the recipe has some errors in it and decided to try it out. Instead of yolks, I added in whole eggs today and my hypothesis was correct. It worked after that!

Of course, I continued to learn. The fickle-minded me decided to do the cream puff instead of eclairs. You need the puff to ‘puff up’ and thus the first half of the baking requires you to bake them in 200 C. Midway through it, I realised that my puff might be burnt, especially the tip of it and decided to turn down the temperature and because of that, they didn’t rise anymore.

For the second batch, I decided to try again. This time round, no matter what happened, I will let them bake for 20 minutes at 200C before turning down the temperature to 180C. It worked! I should have persisted in the first place!

It was really a journey of discovery as I read up more and I cherished this luxury to be able to do so. I would have believed that I have to squeeze in time for this to happen if I were to be enrolled in some courses. I mean, after all, even if I were to be in any culinary classes, the key to doing well is to try out the recipes on your own and to make more discoveries in the process.

So, discoveries I have made. And they are interesting indeed.

Pate a choux or choux paste or cream puff dough is not really a dough nor is it really a batter, though it goes through the stages of both. It begins as a loose combination of water, butter and flour like a batter. But this batter is quickly cooked, the flour absorbs the water, the starch gelatinizes and the mixture becomes stiff, more doughlike. Then eggs are added, beaten into the dough, and the dough thins out and heads back in the direction of a batter. What we have is a partially cooked dough batter that, when baked, puffs into an airy delicate bread that can be filled (often with cream) or coated with melted chocolate (eclairs). (Ruhlman, 2009).

choux paste needs high heat to rise up in the first stage and thus they are baked at a higher temperature for the first 20-25 min until they rise up to max height. Baking them at a reduced temperature for another 20 minutes helps to dry them completely. (Ishida, 2009)

And I discovered that I should place my tray one level lower in the oven so that the top tip will not get burnt when they are placed under high temperature at the first stage.

It’s a wonderful discovery, much more interesting than academics. And with all those food-tasting, I had better do more exercise to burn off the excess fats.

Cocktail rings

Cocktail rings shouldn’t come at a high cost!

These rings are for sale, ranging from $8 to $20. I have seen simillar ones at around $40.  Email at lynnen78@gmail.com to find out more!

choux puffs

     

Dismissal of failure is folly. And it’s worse if one allows failure to break you.

Since that day when I failed in my experimentation with choux puffs, I resolved to attempt again because I suspected that the recipe has some errors in it and decided to try it out. Instead of yolks, I added in whole eggs today and my hypothesis was correct. It worked after that!

Of course, I continued to learn. The fickle-minded me decided to do the cream puff instead of eclairs. You need the puff to ‘puff up’ and thus the first half of the baking requires you to bake them in 200 C. Midway through it, I realised that my puff might be burnt, especially the tip of it and decided to turn down the temperature and because of that, they didn’t rise anymore.

For the second batch, I decided to try again. This time round, no matter what happened, I will let them bake for 20 minutes at 200C before turning down the temperature to 180C. It worked! I should have persisted in the first place!

It was really a journey of discovery as I read up more and I cherished this luxury to be able to do so. I would have believed that I have to squeeze in time for this to happen if I were to be enrolled in some courses. I mean, after all, even if I were to be in any culinary classes, the key to doing well is to try out the recipes on your own and to make more discoveries in the process.

So, discoveries I have made. And they are interesting indeed.

Pate a choux or choux paste or cream puff dough is not really a dough nor is it really a batter, though it goes through the stages of both. It begins as a loose combination of water, butter and flour like a batter. But this batter is quickly cooked, the flour absorbs the water, the starch gelatinizes and the mixture becomes stiff, more doughlike. Then eggs are added, beaten into the dough, and the dough thins out and heads back in the direction of a batter. What we have is a partially cooked dough batter that, when baked, puffs into an airy delicate bread that can be filled (often with cream) or coated with melted chocolate (eclairs). (Ruhlman, 2009).

choux paste needs high heat to rise up in the first stage and thus they are baked at a higher temperature for the first 20-25 min until they rise up to max height. Baking them at a reduced temperature for another 20 minutes helps to dry them completely. (Ishida, 2009)

And I discovered that I should place my tray one level lower in the oven so that the top tip will not get burnt when they are placed under high temperature at the first stage.

It’s a wonderful discovery, much more interesting than academics. And with all those food-tasting, I had better do more exercise to burn off the excess fats.